RE: DNS: AURSC - Announces Deployment of IPv8

RE: DNS: AURSC - Announces Deployment of IPv8

From: Jim Fleming <JimFleming§unety.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1998 07:06:13 -0500
On Saturday, June 20, 1998 3:04 AM, Rick Welykochy[SMTP:rick&#167;dot.net.au] wrote:
&#167;Allen Bolderoff wrote:
&#167;
&#167;> This whole thing sound like a big wank. (sorry for the language) But anyway,
&#167;> after reading sooooo many of your posts (like 25% of my email comes through
&#167;> this list with you contributing 90% of the noise), it seems that all you are
&#167;> doing is talking loud and saying nothing.
&#167;
&#167;I did read the IPv8 web pages a while back. Now I cannot find them.
&#167;I guess keeping the rest of us in the dark is the best idea ;)
&#167;
&#167;IPv8 proposes to use some extension bits in the IP header
&#167;to extend IPv4 addressing so "the rest of the galaxy" can
&#167;use extended addressing. I wonder how many routers out
&#167;there recognise IPv8 (or even IPv6).
&#167;

There are three aspects to C+&#167;-n-IPv8:

	1. The IPv8 Governance Plan
	2. The IPv8 Address Management Plan
	3. The IPv8 Protocol

The IPv8 Governance Plan is built around a "structured root".
The TOP 2,048 TLDs in use are "tracked", as in consumer reports.
	http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/domainname/130dftmail/unir.txt

The IPv8 Address Management Plan involves extended addressing.
Unlike IPv6 with 128 bit addresses, IPv8 uses 43 bit addresses plus
a 4 bit TOS field. These 47 bit addresses are compatible with IPv6
and also can fit inside an Ethernet MAC address field which is 48 bits.

The IPv8 Protocol is a simple modification to IPv4. When using the
global IPv4 transport network, a typical packet has a 20 byte IPv4
header and a 20 byte IPv8 header encapsulated behind it. Therefore,
your routers continue to work.

IPv8 differs from the traditional Internet philosophy in two key areas:

One, it is NOT and end-to-end approach. In other words, your PC is
not expected to change, instead a server/gatekeeper sits between
your PC and the IPv4 transport network. This is similar to the arrangement
one has when using WinGate <http://www.wingate.net>. It is also
similar to the H.323 approach. See <http://www.radvision.com>

Two, it is *platform-oriented* not *protocol-oriented*. The idea is to
use a small number of protocols at the base and then to use true
object-oriented technology for the platform built on that base. C+&#167;
is the programming language used on the platform. It was developed
at AT&T Bell Labs during the era when the C++ "virus" was being
hyped on the world. That was a painful era to work past. Thank god
that is behind us.

There is still a lot of work ahead...we will continue to make our way...
everyone is welcome to help...I hope that this has provided a few more
pointers...



Jim Fleming
Unir Corporation - http://www.unir.com
1998 - The Year of the C+&#167;
Received on Sat Jun 20 1998 - 23:35:27 UTC

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